THE BATTLING BACK ‘BOYS: The Journey from Injured Reserve to Redemption | Comeback Cowboys Sean Lee & Morris Claiborne fighting back

THE BATTLING BACK ‘BOYS - The Journey from Injured Reserve to Redemption - The Comeback Cowboys

For some Cowboys, there has been no offseason.

For the few players that ended the 2014 campaign on the injured reserve list, the offseason consisted of about one week before returning to the Valley Ranch facility to continue their rehabilitation process. 

And for the guys who spent most of last fall on IR, it’s been a long, tough road with a lot of hard work. But the good news is that those players should all be ready to play in 2015.

“When the team finishes the year, most guys go home for a period of time, but the rehab guys, I give them a week off and then they’re back,” said Britt Brown, the Dallas Cowboys associate athletic trainer/director of rehabilitation. “They don’t get any time to take a break.

“If it was a newer injury or they just got put on IR [at the end of the season], or if it’s bad enough like Morris Claiborne, then they haven’t gotten any time off at all. And they didn’t get paid during that time of year, either. They don’t get paid until the offseason program starts.”

It’s been a difficult road for Morris Claiborne, the three-year cornerback who initially went out of the lineup with a torn patellar tendon in his left knee during the Dallas Cowboys 38-17 win over New Orleans back on Sept. 28. But, he’d been having some issues with the other knee as well up to that point, so he ended up having surgeries on both knees, about two months apart.

After many long months on crutches, working hard in treatment all during that time, he is finally showing progress.

“Everything’s coming along pretty good,” said Claiborne, who recorded one interception and seven tackles in four games before his season ended. “I’m about five months out of my surgery on my left knee and about three months on my right knee, so they’re both catching up with each other, and they’re both healing. I’m rehabbing both of them right now.”

Originally, Claiborne was scheduled to have surgery on his right knee after the season because even though it hindered his play at times, he could still play through it. But when he hurt the left one, it made sense to take care of both.

“The right one had a hole going through my patella, so it needed to be cleaned up, and it kept swelling up and stuff like that,” Claiborne explained. “It was just one of those things that we were talking about taking care of after the season, but it just so happened the left one went out on me in the New Orleans game, so I had no choice but to take care of both of them. I’d rather it gone the way it went than hurting in pain out there with, ‘I can’t do this, I can’t that,’ because of my knee.”

For all players who suffer year-ending injuries, the frustration and emotional stress are probably worse than any physical pain they go through. It’s a process to get through the realization of the season being over immediately and getting their mind right to take on the task of rehabbing.

“It was very frustrating to go through that,” Claiborne admitted. “With me, having two knee surgeries, that was pretty tough, because your knees, you need those to walk. It was kind of hard for me because I was on crutches for like five months, six months, and it’s hard. And getting around like that in public on crutches, you don’t want to do anything. You just want to sit in bed, and it’s easy to do that.

“The good ones rise up, though, and don’t fall into that shell. That’s where I’m at now. I just want to stay confident in myself, and I know I’m going to come back and make a big impact. That’s how I feel.”

Of course, as difficult as it was for Claiborne to wrap his mind around the fact that his season was over way too soon, consider Sean Lee’s heart-breaking situation. It was a year ago, on the very first day of OTA workouts in 2014, when he sustained a torn ACL that ended his season before it even began. Of course, that it happened so early served as a blessing in disguise because it allowed him that much more time to strengthen the knee and get it back to normal before engaging in this year’s activities. He’s very much on track to be completely healthy for training camp in July.

“He’s doing everything – running, lifting,” Brown said of Lee. “He’s well over the six-month mark, and usually by four months they’re back running and lifting and doing stuff, so he’s way past that at this point. Now that the offseason program has started, he’s full-go into that. He’s already lifting and running normal, cutting and doing stuff like that. He really doesn’t have any restrictions at this point.

“He’s unlucky that he got hurt when he got hurt because he didn’t get to play during the season, but he was lucky enough to get hurt early enough so that he could return to the offseason program and be full-go, which is the most important thing. And he’ll be over a year and four months when next season starts, so he’ll be very far along.”

Claiborne actually credits Lee with helping him get over some of the initial frustration of having his year end so early. During the regular season, guys who are on IR still come to the Valley Ranch facility to rehab, but are somewhat removed from the team’s day-to-day activities. However, having another player with you to experience the lengthy and painful rehab process every day provides a strong sense of camaraderie among teammates that may not have previously had the chance to bond.

“You get a chance to build a stronger relationship with those guys from other positions,” Claiborne said. “You get to see what those guys have been through, and their type of injuries, and you learn. Like Sean Lee. From the moment I started coming in for treatment, he wouldn’t let me be down on myself. It’s easy to go into a shell, and it’s hard to take responsibility and say, ‘This is what happened to me, and this is the next step I have to take.’ I’d be bitter about that, but Sean helped me through that a tremendous amount. And it’s not just him putting on a front. You can tell it’s coming from a good, genuine place.”

Brown pointed out that the rehabbing players are still around a lot during the season, so they aren’t completely removed from the guys who are playing, but still, the nature of the daily schedule for each group makes it difficult for the IR group to stay totally involved in the on-field happenings. Plus, they don’t travel to road games.

“They’re around all day, as much as you need them to be during the season,” Brown said of the injured players. “We usually give them off the weekend because they’re working out five days a week and they just need a couple of days of rest after their rehab week. But they’re in at 7:30 in the morning, and if they want to come in to the team meeting, they can. And they rehab throughout the day.

“They’re usually around until we go on the field for practice, so they interact with their teammates just like they normally do. There is a little bit of distancing with that, but we try not to have it be too much.”

In addition to battling back from his surgeries, Claiborne, who has been hampered by injuries since Dallas selected him sixth overall in the 2012 draft, will also have a fight on his hands for playing time this season from guys who thrived in his absence. That’s in addition to a new crop of rookies, including this year’s first-round pick Byron Jones. At this point, though, Claiborne is still focused on just getting healthy enough to play.

“It’s a day-by-day process, but I’m ahead of the curve so far, as far as feeling better and walking better,” Claiborne said. “That was one of my main things, walking, because a lot of people were telling me that I might not walk again because of this, and that I might never play.

“There’re always those concerns, but I never let that get to me. I just want to show people that I can come back from this, and I feel stronger now that I’m getting better each and every day.”


ROAD TO REDEMPTION: Morris Claiborne not just fighting for a contract


IRVING, Texas – It was a handful of reporters that sat talking to the former No. 6 pick in the NFL draft – which helps tell the story of Morris Claiborne to this point.

The hard truth is that it’s easy to overlook Claiborne in June of 2015, just nine months after he tore his patellar tendon and two months after the Dallas Cowboys declined to pick up the fifth-year option on his contract.

Standing just outside the tunnel to the stadium locker room, none of that seemed to bother the former first-round pick, who miraculously appears as though he’ll be ready for training camp in six weeks.

“I’m just ready to go,” he said. “It’s not so much you want to prove everybody wrong or do this and that, but I hear a lot of stuff. I hear what people say, I hear what people write, and that’s not me. I just want to show them.”

Those are encouraging words from Claiborne, who has plenty left to show in the final year of his contract. After missing 12 games last season with his torn patellar, he has only appeared in 29 of 50 games with three interceptions in his career.

It’s not surprising, then, that the Cowboys opted not to pick up his option, which would have paid him roughly $11 million in 2016. It wasn’t even surprising to Claiborne.

“Why would you put so much on a person that, you don’t know where he’ll be standing? If I was on the other side, I wouldn’t do it,” he said. “It’s just one of those things – it’s a business, and I approach it that way. I’ve got to go put in some work, and I’ve got to make somebody want me. I don’t want nothing to be given to me.”

Claiborne has clearly done an impressive amount of work just to be ready for training camp. He didn’t mix into full-team practices during OTAs and minicamp, but he expects to be ready to go by July – if he isn’t already there.

“I feel good – ready to go. Period, point-blank,” he said. “No matter how you cut it, I’m ready to go.”

If that wasn’t impressive enough in its own right, consider that Claiborne told reporters he dropped all the way down to 150 pounds during the recovery process. He said he’s currently at 172, with an eye on a 180-pound playing weight for training camp.

“The training staff is trying to get me to take a little time off, but I don’t feel comfortable not working at this point. I want to be ready, whatever it takes,” he said. “I feel like if you want something you’ve never had, you’ve got to do something you’ve never done.”

That’s good news for the Dallas Cowboys, who signed Corey White and drafted Byron Jones to help bolster their prospects in the defensive backfield. Whatever the expectations might be, Claiborne said his goals are simple.

“Being able to play, staying on the field,” he said. “The focus is simple: go play football, no matter what. No matter what happens – get hurt again, you’ve got to find a way to get out of that.”

That raises a morbid thought for Claiborne to deal with. Last year wasn’t his first season cut short by injuries, as he missed six games in 2013 and also sat out one as a rookie.

His response to that thought was just as simple and forthright as his others.

“I always think about that: what if all the things you’ve done now, you get another setback? But I’ll work. If I’m in the same situation again, I’ll continue to work,” he said. “I’m going to continue to do this and go until I can’t any more – no matter what happens. I’m going to do this until I die, really.”


Editors note: A special effort is made to bring you full audio or full video whenever possible. You’re encouraged to watch this entire interview over on the Video Archives page.

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