Tag Archives: Charles Haley

WALL OF SHAME TO HALL OF FAME: Flashback–Change of scenery worked for Charles Haley; he thinks Dallas will help Hardy | Counseling was key to smarter decisions, funneling rage and leaving aggressiveness on the field

WALL OF SHAME TO HALL OF FAME: Flashback–Change of scenery worked for Charles Haley; he thinks Dallas will help Hardy | Counseling was key to smarter decisions, funneling rage and leaving aggressiveness on the field

Greg Hardy isn’t the first player the Dallas Cowboys have ever brought in with baggage.

“Bags?” Charles Haley mused, “I had suitcases. Full suitcases.”

Haley was one of the NFL’s best pass rushers at the turn of the 1990 decade. He hit double figures in sacks in four of his first six seasons and went to three Pro Bowls. He was San Francisco’s dominant pass rusher on back­-to­-back Super Bowl champions in 1988­-89.

But Haley had issues. Anger issues. There were confrontations with his coaches and teammates. Continue reading →

SACKED FOR FIFTH TIME: Dallas Cowboys living legend Charles Haley again denied induction into NFL Hall of Fame

Charles Haley won’t be included in NFL Hall of Fame Class of 2014 - The Boys Are Back

IRVING, Texas – Once again, Charles Haley’s been left out of the latest Hall of Fame class.

This marked the fifth year Haley, who’s the only player in NFL history with five Super Bowl rings, was a Hall of Fame finalist without getting in. Michael Strahan, Andre Reed, Walter Jones, Derrick Brooks, Aeneas Williams, Claude Humphrey and Ray Guy all were named into the Class of 2014.

Haley ranks 12th in Cowboys history with 34 sacks and had 100.5 for his career.  He would have been the 13th former Cowboys player who accrued at least five years with the team to be named to the Hall of Fame.

Haley, who was the NFC Defensive Player of the Year twice in his career, joined the Cowboys in 1992 in a trade from San Francisco. Many believe Haley was the difference-maker on defense to put the team over the hump. Emmitt Smith, Troy Aikman and Michael Irvin were already in place and leading a high-octane offense, but it was Haley’s presence that added a needed piece.

The converted defensive end had six sacks in his first season but played a big role in the Cowboys having the No. 1 ranked defense in the NFL in 1992. In Super Bowl XXVII, Haley made a game-changing play when he sacked Bills quarterback Jim Kelly and forced a fumble, which was recovered in midair by Jimmie Jones for a touchdown. The Cowboys eventually pulled away for a convincing 52-17 win.

Haley had four sacks in 1993 but his most memorable moment came after a Week 2 loss to Buffalo, which dropped the Cowboys to 0-2. Haley emphatically slammed his helmet through a locker room wall at Texas Stadium and voiced his anger in the Cowboys’ not having signed Emmitt Smith, who was two games into a contract dispute with Jerry Jones and the organization. Haley’s comment, “We can’t win with a rookie,” in reference to Smith’s backup Derrick Lassic, might have been the final straw as the Cowboys and Smith came to terms the next week. Smith went on to have an MVP season and the Cowboys won another Super Bowl.

The Cowboys went back to the No. 1 defense in 1994 and Haley had his first double-digit sack season with the club with 12.5, including four in the season opener in Pittsburgh.

Haley had 10.5 sacks in 1995, battling through a bad back all season. He had a sack against the Steelers in Super Bowl XXX, which helped him earn his league-best fifth Super Bowl ring.

In three Super Bowls with the Cowboys, Haley had 2.5 sacks and he had 4.5 sacks in his five Super Bowl games played


RELATED: Charles Haley won’t be included in NFL Hall of Fame Class of 2014

SACKED FOR FIFTH TIME - Dallas Cowboys living legend Charles Haley denied his induction into NFL Hall of Fame - The Boys Are Back 2014

NEW YORK – Charles Haley’s wait continues.

The fifth time was not the charm for the former Dallas Cowboys defensive lineman, who again was denied entry into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Derrick Brooks, Walter Jones, Andre Reed, Michael Strahan, Aeneas Williams, Ray Guy and Claude Humphrey form the Class of 2014, announced Saturday night. Brooks and Jones earned enshrinement as first-year eligible candidates, and Strahan made it after missing last year in his first year of eligibility.

Williams and Reed have waited longer, with Reed in his ninth year of eligibility and Williams in his fifth. Guy, the first punter to earn induction and only the second true specialist, and Humphrey were seniors nominees.

The seven-man class will be enshrined in Canton this summer.

The 46 selectors met for a record 8 hours, 59 minutes, with Haley’s discussion taking 25 minutes. Discussion on Tony Dungy lasted 47 minutes, the longest of the day, with Brooks taking only 10 minutes.

Haley made the cut to 10, but he, Jerome Bettis, Kevin Greene, Marvin Harrison and Will Shields were eliminated in the reduction to five. Morten Andersen, Tim Brown, Eddie DeBartolo Jr., Tony Dungy and John Lynch were eliminated from consideration in the first reduction ballot from 15 to 10.

Haley, whose final retirement came following the 1999 season, has been eligible for enshrinement for 10 years. In that time, he has watched seven teammates inducted into the Hall of Fame.

It had seemed this might be Haley’s year.

He remains the only player with five Super Bowl rings, winning two with the San Francisco 49ers and three with the Cowboys.

Haley’s teams went 153-66, including 19-6 in the postseason. Only once in 12 regular seasons did his team have a losing record. That was in 1999 after he had retired and then unretired.

His teams won 10 division titles, and he played in seven NFC Championship Games. His teams missed the playoffs only twice.

SHAME BY THE FAME: Former Dallas Cowboys DE Charles Haley worthy of Pro Football Hall of Fame induction

SHAME BY THE FAME - Former Dallas Cowboys DE Charles Haley worthy of Pro Football Hall of Fame induction - The Boys Are Back 2014

NEW YORK — Peyton Manning’s legacy is a recurring theme in the buildup to this Super Bowl. If the quarterback stands victorious Sunday evening, if he helps lead his second franchise to a title …

Well, then he’ll be only three rings behind Charles Haley.

The night before Denver and Seattle take the field, the Hall of Fame will announce its class of 2014. Haley is a finalist for the fifth time.

Two of those rings came as a linebacker for the San Francisco 49ers. The final three came as a defensive end for the Dallas Cowboys.

Receiver Michael Irvin and quarterback Troy Aikman played with Haley on those Super Bowl teams. Both have busts in Canton.

They believe it’s time for Haley to join them.

“I think Charles should be in,” Irvin said. “We’re willing to give Peyton Manning credit, so much credit, if he wins this game because we’re going to say he led two different teams to Super Bowl championships. He deserves the credit.

“But we won’t give Charles Haley any of that credit? He led two different teams to Super Bowls, but we won’t give him any kind of credit?”

Haley was part of 10 division championship teams in his 12 years in the NFL. He played in six NFC Championship Games in a span of seven seasons. He was voted to the NFL Pro Bowl five times, was the NFC Defensive Player of the Year twice and finished his career with 100 1/2 sacks.

Credit isn’t the issue. No one can discredit those numbers. What Haley lacks is the historical affirmation only the Hall of Fame can provide.

Irvin is no stranger to off-the-field issues. Those didn’t prevent him from enshrinement in his third year as a finalist.

But Irvin can’t help but wonder if Haley’s well-documented troubles have worked against him in the committee’s discussions. Haley’s abusive behavior during his playing days won few friends in the media.

Aikman has the same questions.

“I don’t like the process,” said the quarterback who joined the Hall in 2006 in his first year of eligibility. “I don’t like the way that it’s done.

“I do believe he should be in the Hall of Fame. I’ve said that. I’m biased because I watched him every weekend. I’m amazed that he’s not in the Hall of Fame.

“I’m sorry, but if him being rude to some writers or not being accommodating to those in the media keeps him from being in the Hall of Fame, then I really disagree with the process, because that’s not what this is about. I don’t know what happens, but I know he was largely responsible for a big amount of the success that we had during those years.”

Former Dallas Cowboys coach Jimmy Johnson is curious as to why Haley has yet to be enshrined.

“I’ve said many, many times that Charles Haley should have been in the Hall of Fame a long time ago,” Johnson said. “No offense to any of the players in there, but I coached and coached against a lot of the players that are in the Hall of Fame, and Charles Haley is better than them.

“Again, I don’t know the rhyme or reason by some of the voting.”

Aikman, Irvin and Johnson hope someone is listening to them when it comes to Haley.

“A man that holds as many rings as digits on a hand,” Irvin said, “he should be in the Hall of Fame.”

PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME: Dallas Cowboys defensive lineman Charles Haley a finalist for the fifth time

PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME - Dallas Cowboys defensive lineman Charles Haley a finalist for the fifth time - Dallas Cowboys living legend

IRVING, Texas – Former Dallas Cowboys defensive lineman Charles Haley is once again one of the finalists for the NFL Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Haley, a finalist for the fifth time, joins four first-year eligible nominees among the 15 modern-era finalists to be considered for election to the Hall of Fame when the selection committee meets in New York City on Feb. 1.

If Haley made it this year, he’d be the 15th Cowboys player to be elected to the Hall of Fame, joining Troy Aikman, Larry Allen, Tony Dorsett, Bob Hayes, Michael Irvin, Tom Landry, Bob Lilly, Mel Renfro, Deion Sanders, Tex Schramm, Emmitt Smith, Roger Staubach, Randy White, and Rayfield Wright.

Haley played 12 seasons and in 169 games and is the only player in NFL history to play on five Super Bowl winning teams between his time in Dallas and San Francisco.

He began his career as a linebacker in San Francisco, where he recorded four double-digit sack seasons. He’d later get traded to the Cowboys, where he’d record two more double-digit sack seasons in 1994 and 1995 as a defensive end.  Haley finished his career with 100.5 total sacks, getting named to five Pro Bowls and garnering two All-Pro selections.

Former Dallas Cowboys head coach Jimmy Johnson, who was a semifinalist this year and won two Super Bowl titles during his time in Dallas, didn’t make the list of finalists.

The 15 modern-era finalists will be the only ones considered for Hall of Fame election when the 46-member selection committee meets. A finalist must receive a minimum positive vote of 80 percent to be elected.

To be eligible for election, players and coaches must have last played or coached more than five seasons ago. Derrick Brooks, Tony Dungy, Marvin Harrison and Walter Jones are the four first-year eligible nominees. Haley and Kevin Greene have both been eligible for 10 years.

All the finalists were determined by a vote of the selection committee from a list of 126 nominees, which was reduced to a list of 25 semifinalists. In addition, Ray Guy and Claude Humphrey were selected as senior candidates by the Hall of Fame’s Seniors Committee, leaving 15 modern-era and two senior nominees among the full list of finalists.

Here’s a list of all the finalists:

    Morten Andersen, Kicker

    Jerome Bettis, Running Back

    Derrick Brooks, Linebacker

    Tim Brown, Wide Receiver/Kick Returner/Punt Returner

    Edward DeBartolo, Jr., Owner

    Tony Dungy, Coach

    Kevin Greene, Linebacker/Defensive End

    *Ray Guy, Punter

    Charles Haley, Defensive End/Linebacker

    Marvin Harrison, Wide Receiver

    *Claude Humphrey, Defensive End

    Walter Jones, Tackle

    John Lynch, Free Safety

    Andre Reed, Wide Receiver

    Will Shields, Guard

    Michael Strahan, Defensive End

    Aeneas Williams, Cornerback/Safety

    PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME: NFL fans can select their top 15 candidates to make it as 2014 HOF finalists

    NFL Pro Football Hall of Fame - Fan Vote - NFL HOF - Charles Haley Jimmy Johnson

    The list of 126 nominees has been trimmed to 25 modern-era semifinalists and it includes a former Dallas Cowboys head coach that won two Super Bowls and the key defensive player who helped him get there.

    cowboys' owner jerry jones and former dallas coach jimmy johnson visit in a suite during the concert at the new cowboys stadium saturday afternoon - the boys are back blog

    Jimmy Johnson is one of the first-year eligible nominees to make the list of 25 semifinalists. The only other with Cowboys ties is Charles Haley, who has been a finalist each of the last four years.

    Johnson, who replaced Tom Landry as Dallas Cowboys head coach in 1989, spent five years in Dallas and guided the team to back-to-back Super Bowl titles in 1992 and 1993.

    Johnson left coaching after that season, only to return in 1996 for a four-year run in Miami.

    Charles Haley is the only player with five Super Bowl rings, winning two with the 49ers, where he played from 1986-91 and three in Dallas.

    Haley joined the Dallas Cowboys in 1992 and is often considered the last key ingredient to those Super Bowl winning teams that included the “Triplets” on offense with Troy Aikman, Emmitt Smith and Michael Irvin.

    Other first-year nominees include Marvin Harrison and Steve Wisniewski, who was actually a Cowboys’ second-round pick in 1989 but was traded to Oakland for more picks, including one used to draft Daryl Johnston just 10 selections later.

    Charles Haley is the only player with five Super Bowl rings, winning three with the Dallas Cowboys

    Here’s the complete list of modern-era semifinalists is as follows:

    • Morten Andersen, K – 1982-1994 New Orleans Saints, 1995-2000, 2006-07 Atlanta Falcons, 2001 New York Giants, 2002-03 Kansas City Chiefs, 2004 Minnesota Vikings

    • Steve Atwater, S – 1989-1998 Denver Broncos, 1999 New York Jets

    • Jerome Bettis, RB – 1993-95 Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams, 1996-2005 Pittsburgh Steelers

    • Derrick Brooks, LB – 1995-2008 Tampa Bay Buccaneers

    • Tim Brown, WR/KR – 1988-2003 Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders, 2004 Tampa Bay Buccaneers (Dallas area)

    • Don Coryell, Coach – 1973-77 St. Louis Cardinals, 1978-1986 San Diego Chargers 

    • Roger Craig, RB – 1983-1990 San Francisco 49ers, 1991 Los Angeles Raiders, 1992-93 Minnesota Vikings

    • Terrell Davis, RB – 1995-2001 Denver Broncos

    • Edward DeBartolo, Jr., Owner – 1977-2000 San Francisco 49ers

    • Tony Dungy, Coach – 1996-2001 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 2002-08 Indianapolis Colts

    • Kevin Greene, LB/DE – 1985-1992 Los Angeles Rams, 1993-95 Pittsburgh Steelers, 1996, 1998-99 Carolina Panthers, 1997 San Francisco 49ers

    • Charles Haley, DE/LB – 1986-1991, 1999 San Francisco 49ers, 1992-96 Dallas Cowboys

    • Marvin Harrison, WR – 1996-2008 Indianapolis Colts

    • Joe Jacoby, T – 1981-1993 Washington Redskins

    • Jimmy Johnson, Coach – 1989-1993 Dallas Cowboys, 1996-99 Miami Dolphins 

    • Walter Jones, – T – 1997-2008 Seattle Seahawks

    • John Lynch, FS – 1993-2003 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 2004-07 Denver Broncos

    • Karl Mecklenburg, LB – 1983-1994 Denver Broncos

    • Andre Reed, WR – 1985-1999 Buffalo Bills, 2000 Washington Redskins

    • Will Shields, G – 1993-2006 Kansas City Chiefs

    • Michael Strahan, DE – 1993-2007 New York Giants

    • Paul Tagliabue, Commissioner – 1989-2006 National Football League 

    • Aeneas Williams, CB/S – 1991-2000 Phoenix/Arizona Cardinals, 2001-04 St. Louis Rams

    • Steve Wisniewski, G – 1989-2001 Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders

    • George Young, Contributor – 1968-1974 Baltimore Colts, 1975-78 Miami Dolphins, 1979-1997 New York Giants, 1998-2001 National Football League

      • The list of 25 semifinalists will be reduced by mail ballot to 15 modern-era finalists.  That list increases to 17 finalist nominees with the inclusion of the two recommended candidates of the Hall of Fame’s Seniors Committee. The Seniors Committee nominees, who were announced in August, are:

        • Ray Guy – Punter (1973-86 Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders)
        • Claude Humphrey – Defensive end (1968-78 Falcons, 1979-81 Eagles)

        Continue reading →

        FIVE FINGER FAMELESS: Former Dallas Cowboys DE Charles Haley missed out on HOF again

        Former Cowboys defensive end Charles Haley and his five Super Bowl rings belong in the Pro Football Hall of Fame

        Former Cowboys defensive end Charles Haley and his five Super Bowl rings belong in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

        He was denied again this year, largely because of the logjam of first-time eligible, shoo-in candidates like Larry Allen, Warren Sapp and Jonathan Ogden.

        But with former Colts receiver Marvin Harrison and Tampa Bay linebacker Derrick Brooks as the only big name first-time candidates up next year, Haley, a four-time finalist, should finally get his gold jacket in 2014.

        He finished his career with 100.5 career sacks, was a five-time Pro Bowler and a first-team All-Pro twice.

        All that pales in comparison to being a key member of five title teams, two with the 49ers and three with the Cowboys.

        As much as the Cowboys were about the Hall of Fame triplets on offense in Troy Aikman, Emmitt Smith and Michael Irvin, they didn’t sniff the Super Bowl and become champions until they made the trade with San Francisco for Haley.

        He was the final piece to the Cowboys’ dynasty team of the 1990’s and very much deserving of induction into the Hall of Fame.

        That should come next year. 

        NFL PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME: Projecting the finalists for the Class of 2013 (Special Feature)

        NFL Pro Football Hall of Fame - Fifty Years - The Boys Are Back blog

        The race to the postseason presses on, with some teams vying for playoff spots while others deal with the walking wounded and the disappointment only a lost season can bring.

        That’s the basis of the NFL — competition. So it should come as no surprise that when it comes to celebrating the all-time greats of the game, a certain level of competition exists before determining just who those "greats," or, as it were, Hall of Famers, are. This competition doesn’t take place on the playing field; rather, it’s a game of survival of the fittest in the Hall of Fame voters’ hearts and minds. Who will make the cut?

        Well, much as with the playoffs, there’s an elimination process. A giant initial list is reduced to 25 (plus two Senior Committee nominees), with the next big cut paring the group down to 15 finalists early next month. With that in mind, evaluate the field to determine who makes the next jump.

        Here are a couple of notes to get you in line, with regard to handicapping the field of outstanding former players looking to don the coveted yellow jacket:

        » Only consider what occurred on the field. Can’t guarantee that same stipulation is made by every voter.

        » Pro Bowls mean very little, especially in the Y2K era, when a trip to Hawaii was more about reputation and popularity than it had ever been.

        » Some guys dominated for a short period of time; others excelled for more than 10 years. Both types of legacies are valuable to these eyes.

        Semifinalists are broke up the into five categories, according to their likelihood of making it to the next stage. Here goes …

        SHOO-INS

        Larry Allen (G/T, 1994-2007) and Jonathan Ogden (T, 1996-2007): Both are first-ballot Hall of Fame players all the way. It would be shocking if both don’t make it to Canton right away. Allen was dominant at two line positions and has a Super Bowl ring. So does Ogden, who, along with Walter Jones, was the dominant left tackle in pro football during the Y2K era.

        LIKELY FINALISTS

        Tim Brown (WR/KR, 1988-2004): A finalist last year, Brown, who retired with more than 1,000 career pass receptions, has gotten some juice in the media. What shouldn’t be forgotten is what a good returner he was out of the gate. He’ll be a finalist again this year.

        Cris Carter (WR, 1987-2002): Like Brown, Carter was a finalist last year and also has more than 1,000 catches to his credit. This is the year the former Minnesota Vikings great gets in. Of all the Hall of Fame "injustices," Carter is the new Art Monk, i.e., the guy who must not wait any longer.

        Bill Parcells (head coach, 1983-2006): Parcells should be a shoo-in. Winning two Super Bowl rings and taking four franchises to the playoffs should be enough. And what about spawning Bill Belichick’s career? He’ll be a finalist again this year. (Prediction: The Tuna goes all the way.)

        Andre Reed (WR, 1985-2000): So many fans feel sorry for Reed, particularly those in Buffalo. He’ll make the finalists’ cut again, but I’m not convinced he’s a Hall of Fame player. Evidently, the voters aren’t, either. The wide receiver tally reads Carter, Brown … and then Reed.

        Warren Sapp (DT, 1995-2007): One of the dominant defensive tackles, if not the dominant DT of his era, he should be a finalist in his first year of eligibility. Bear in mind the fact that Sapp won a Super Bowl on a team known for its defense. That’s key.

        Will Shields (G, 1993-2006): This guy was about as premium a player as a club could have on the offensive line. Take a look at Priest Holmes’ insane numbers from 2001 to 2003, or Larry Johnson’s campaign in 2005, when he gained 1,750 yards. During Shields’ last season, Kansas City ranked ninth in the league in rushing. The year after? The Chiefs finished 32nd. He was a great offensive lineman, but with Allen and Ogden locks, this might not be his year.

        Jerome Bettis (RB, 1993-2005): Bettis is a sure bet to make the finalist list, due to his popularity and his status as the NFL’s sixth all-time leading rusher. He’s a 50-50 proposition for enshrinement this year.

        Edward DeBartolo, Jr. (owner, 1977-2000): The recent "A Football Life" documentary gave DeBartolo some run, but the concern here stems from the well-documented issues surrounding his involvement with former Louisiana Governor Edwin Edwards and a river-boat casino controversy. He makes the finalists’ list. DeBartolo was too influential — and too successful (five rings) — not to be considered a strong candidate.

        Kevin Greene (LB/DE, 1985-1999): Like Bettis, Greene is probably a 50-50 proposition to make the Hall, if his odds aren’t a little lower. The man with 160 sacks (third all-time) was a finalist last year and should be again.

        Charles Haley (DE/LB, 1986-1996, 1999): If there’s one guy you can’t believe is not yet in the Hall of Fame, it’s got to be Charles Haley. Haley has five Super Bowl rings, and he was a disruptive force, the linchpin that pushed the Dallas Cowboys of the 1990s to the highest levels of success. Those factors easily push Haley into the finalists’ group … again.

        John Lynch (S, 1993-2007): Lynch was an incredibly popular player. His pedigree and affable nature, and the fact that he — like Sapp — was a key cog on a Super Bowl-winning team known for its defense, will easily be enough to get him on the finalists’ list. Lynch brought a Ronnie Lott-type mentality to the safety position.

        Aeneas Williams (CB/S, 1991-2004): The NFC’s second-best corner (behind Deion Sanders) of the 1990s will eventually get in the Hall of Fame, because there aren’t many corners of his ilk not already in.

        Don Coryell (head coach, 1973-1986): Coryell was a master innovator whose tweaks to offensive football, as well as the numbering system used for route trees, made the modern passing game simpler for quarterbacks. He turned around two franchises – the Cardinals and the San Diego Chargers — and will eventually have a bust in Canton. It’s a matter of when, not if.

        CLOSE … BUT NOT THIS TIME

        Morten Andersen (K, 1982-2004, 2006-2007): The NFL’s only player to be the all-time leading scorer of two franchises, Anderson probably won’t make it — rightly or wrongly — because he was a kicker.

        Steve Atwater (S, 1989-1999): Atwater would knock your lights out. Sometimes, he’d inadvertently destroy his fellow DBs in the process. The former Denver Broncos great was impactful from his first training camp on, something that can’t be said about everyone on the semifinalists’ list. Projection: Atwater’s votes are cannibalized by another heavy hitter, John Lynch.

        Terrell Davis (RB, 1995-2001): This is Davis’ seventh year of eligibility. That should tell you something. All those Mike Shanahan-coached running backs who’ve gained 1,000 yards — like Alfred Morris — aren’t helping Davis’ cause. It’s unfortunate.

        Joe Jacoby (T, 1981-1993): Teammate Russ Grimm was inducted into the Hall in 2010. Grimm is still coaching in the NFL, which probably kept him on the radar. The pantheon of Washington Redskins greats includes a few names before we get to Jacoby, despite the fact he was quietly effective for the better part of 13 years.

        Art Modell (owner, 1961-2011): The recently deceased owner will probably fall short. The fear is that when he moved his team from Cleveland to Baltimore, where they became the Ravens, will never be overlooked. Modell did much for the league in six decades of service. It won’t be enough.

        Michael Strahan (DE, 1993-2007): Strahan’s popular, he’s in the public eye, and he was an outstanding pass rusher with 141.5 career sacks. This is the toughest former player to project, but with Haley and Greene still waiting, Strahan may be the odd man out.

        Paul Tagliabue (commissioner, 1989-2006): Back in the public eye due to the New Orleans Saints’ bounty fiasco, the former de facto CEO will eventually reside in Canton. Voters haven’t been impressed enough by Tagliabue’s contributions to push him forward in the selection process.

        Steve Tasker (ST/WR, 1985-1997): The greatest special teams player in the modern history of the league, Tasker’s viability doesn’t improve … because he is the greatest special teams player. The reason he could be a possible Hall of Famer is the same factor that keeps him out. Odd.

        George Young (contributor, 1968-2001): "Contributor" is hard for some fans to contemplate and, at the end of the day, appreciate. The former New York Giants general manager drafted Phil Simms and Lawrence Taylor, and built excellent football teams in the 1986 and 1990 Giants. Still, is he among the top 15 names mentioned? Don’t imagine the voters lean that way.

        HALL OF VERY GOOD

        Roger Craig (RB, 1983-1993): Craig was a fantastic all-around player and, ultimately, a Hall-of-Very Gooder. He was a three-dimensional running back, much like Walter Payton, but without the far-reaching numbers. With just three 1,000-yard rushing seasons (and another receiving), Craig faces a long road to enshrinement.

        Karl Mecklenburg (LB, 1983-1994): Versatile and consistent, Mecklenburg was the kind of player who could play with his hand in the dirt, stand up at outside linebacker, or play inside, like Sean Lee. Call him an athlete who defensive coordinators in 2012 could wrap their arms around. Nonetheless, the Hall of Fame is for the elite of the elite.

        SENTIMENTAL CHOICE

        Albert Lewis (CB, 1983-1998): Albert Lewis was a remarkable football player. At 6-foot-2, he could lock up with the giants of today, like Brandon Marshall. Besides having 42 career interceptions, and starting at corner until he was 38 — 38! — Lewis blocked an astounding 11 kicks in his career.

        Courtesy: Elliot Harrison

        More coverage on Profootballhof.com
        Learn all about the illustrious careers of the 2013 Hall of Fame semifinalists, including highlights from hopeful enshrinee Warren Sapp.More … 

        » Hopefuls photo gallery 
        » Semifinalists by year
         
        » Selection process

        CANTON COWBOYS: Larry Allen joins Charles Haley on 2013 Hall of Fame ballot

        Former Dallas Cowboys offensive lineman Larry Allen was among the 27 Pro Football Hall of Fame semifinalists announced Friday.

        Allen was joined on the list by former Cowboys defensive lineman Charles Haley and former Cowboys coach Bill Parcells, both finalists last year.

        Allen is among six first-year eligible candidates, joining kicker Morten Andersen, safety John Lynch, offensive tackle Jonathan Ogden, defensive tackle Warren Sapp and defensive end Michael Strahan.

        In addition to the six first-year eligible nominees, one other previously eligible candidate, cornerback Albert Lewis, is a semifinalist for the first time.

        Each of the remaining 20 nominees on the selection committee’s list has been a semifinalist at least once before this year.

        Charles Haley 1

        Haley, who played for the Cowboys from 1992-96, has been eligible eight years and a finalist the past three years. Parcells, who coached the Cowboys from 2003-06, was a finalist last year.

        Flashback 2006 - Tony Romo's first start as Dallas Cowboys QB - Bill Parcells - The Boys Are Back blog

        The list of 27 semifinalists will be reduced by mail ballot to 15 modern-era finalists. That list increases to 17 finalist nominees with the inclusion of senior committee nominees defensive tackle Curley Culp and linebacker Dave Robinson.

        The results of the modern-era reduction vote to 15 finalists will be announced in early January 2013.

        The Class of 2013 will be determined at the selection committee’s annual meeting Feb. 2, the day before Super Bowl XLVII, in New Orleans. The Class of 2013 will be enshrined Aug. 3 in Canton, Ohio.

        HONOR: Chad Hennings to announce Dallas Cowboys second-round pick

        IRVING, Texas — The NFL is continuing last year’s decision to have retired players announce second-round selections for their former teams, and Chad Hennings will do the honors for the Dallas Cowboys on Friday in New York City.

        Hennings played his entire nine-year career with the Cowboys and was a rookie on their 1992 Super Bowl team. Dallas originally drafted him in the 11th round of the 1988 draft, and he joined them four years later after fulfilling his service commitment with the Air Force.

        A member of all three championship teams in the 1990s, he played in 119 games and had 27.5 sacks at defensive tackle.

        Ring of Honor inductee Charles Haley announced last year’s second-round pick, linebacker Bruce Carter.

        NFL HALL OF FAME: Charles Haley, Bill Parcells named as finalists

          Former Cowboys defensive end Charles Haley and head coach Bill Parcells are among 15 modern-era finalists for the 2012 Pro Football Hall of Fame class.

          The full finalist list is 17 with the inclusion of two recommended candidates of the Hall of Fame’s Seniors Committee, Jack Butler and Dick Stanfel.

          Parcells, the Cowboys’ head coach from 2003-06, joins guard Will Shields as one of two first-year eligible candidates. Parcells has been a finalist twice before (2001, 2002) following his retirement as Jets head coach in 1999, but at the time, the Hall of Fame by-laws did not require a coach to be retired the now mandatory five seasons.

          Parcells won two Super Bowls with the Giants (1986 and 1990) and compiled a 34-32 record with the Cowboys, becoming the first head coach in NFL history to lead four different teams to the playoffs (Giants, Patriots, Jets, Cowboys).

          Haley won an NFL player-record five Super Bowls in 13 NFL seasons — two with the San Francisco 49ers from 1986-91 and three with the Cowboys from 1992-96. He finished with 100.5 career sacks and was inducted into the Cowboys Ring of Honor last November.

          The Selection Committee will elect the 2012 Class on Feb. 4 in Indianapolis, the site of Super Bowl XLVI.

          Although there is no set number for any class of enshrinees, the Pro Football Hall of Fame’s current ground rules stipulate that between four and seven new members will be selected each year. No more than five modern-era nominees can be elected in a given year and a class of six or seven can only be achieved if one or both senior nominees are elected.

          The complete list of 17 finalists, courtesy of the Pro Football Hall of Fame:

          • Jerome Bettis, RB – 1993-95 Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams, 1996-2005 Pittsburgh Steelers

          • Tim Brown, WR/KR – 1988-2003 Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders, 2004 Tampa Bay Buccaneers

          • Jack Butler – CB – 1951-59 Pittsburgh Steelers

          • Cris Carter, WR – 1987-89 Philadelphia Eagles, 1990-2001 Minnesota Vikings, 2002 Miami Dolphins

          • Dermontti Dawson, C – 1988-2000 Pittsburgh Steelers

          • Edward DeBartolo, Jr., Owner – 1979-2000 San Francisco 49ers

          • Chris Doleman, DE/LB – 1985-1993, 1999 Minnesota Vikings, 1994-95 Atlanta Falcons, 1996-98 San Francisco 49ers

          • Kevin Greene, LB/DE – 1985-1992 Los Angeles Rams, 1993-95 Pittsburgh Steelers, 1996, 1998-99 Carolina Panthers, 1997 San Francisco 49ers

          • Charles Haley, DE/LB – 1986-1991, 1999 San Francisco 49ers, 1992-96 Dallas Cowboys

          • Cortez Kennedy, DT – 1990-2000 Seattle Seahawks

          • Curtis Martin, RB – 1995-97 New England Patriots, 1998-2005 New York Jets

          • Bill Parcells, Coach – 1983-1990 New York Giants, 1993-96 New England Patriots, 1997-99 New York Jets, 2003-06 Dallas Cowboys

          • Andre Reed, WR – 1985-1999 Buffalo Bills, 2000 Washington Redskins

          • Willie Roaf, T – 1993-2001 New Orleans Saints, 2002-05 Kansas City Chiefs

          • Will Shields, G – 1993-2006 Kansas City Chiefs

          • Dick Stanfel – G, 1952-55 Detroit Lions, 1956-58 Washington Redskins

          • Aeneas Williams, CB/S – 1991-2000 Phoenix/Arizona Cardinals, 2001-04 St. Louis Rams

          Charles Haley approaching next Hall of Fame step

          Former Dallas Cowboy star Charles Haley poses at his Dallas home with his unprecedented five Super Bowl rings and trophies, won while playing first in San Francisco (two on the left), then Dallas (three on the right). Haley is up for admission to the Pro Football Hall Of Fame. Fort Worth Star-Telegram / Paul Moseley

          Fort Worth Star-Telegram / Paul Moseley

          Former Dallas Cowboy star Charles Haley poses at his Dallas home with his unprecedented five Super Bowl rings and trophies, won while playing first in San Francisco (two on the left), then Dallas (three on the right). Haley is up for admission to the Pro Football Hall Of Fame.


          IRVING, Texas — Will Charles Haley again get one step closer to the Pro Football Hall of Fame?

          Fifteen modern-era finalists for the 2012 Class will be announced this Saturday. Haley and former Cowboys head coach Bill Parcells (2003-06) are among 26 current semifinalists. It is usually limited to 25, but this year there are 26 resulting from a tie for the final position.

          A finalist the last two years, Haley won an NFL player-record five Super Bowls in 13 NFL seasons – two with the San Francisco 49ers from 1986-91 and three with the Cowboys from 1992-96. He was inducted into the Cowboys’ Ring of Honor this past November.

          Parcells won two Super Bowls with the Giants (1986 and 1990) and compiled a 34-32 record with the Cowboys, becoming the first head coach in NFL history to lead four different teams to the playoffs (Giants, Patriots, Jets, Cowboys).

          The finalist list will increase to 17 with the inclusion of the two recommended candidates of the Hall of Fame’s Seniors Committee, Jack Butler and Dick Stanfel. The 2012 Hall of Fame Class will be determined and announced Feb. 4 on Super Bowl weekend.

          INSIDE THE NUMBERS: Milestones achieved during the Dallas Cowboys vs. Philadelphia Eagles game

          A group of Santas get ready for a halftime performance.

          Star-Telegram/Ron Jenkins

          A group of Santa’s get ready for a halftime performance.


          Here are notes compiled by the Dallas Cowboys’ staff:

          The Dallas Cowboys did not throw an interception today, and it marked Dallas’ fourth straight game without throwing an interception. It is the longest streak for the Cowboys since 2009 (four straight, 11/26-12/19).

          The Dallas Cowboys avoided a shutout today with a touchdown in the fourth quarter. The last time Dallas was held scoreless was at New England (11/16/03). It also extended their streak of home games without a shutout to 166. The last time Dallas was shutout at home was against Philadelphia (9/15/91).

          Read more …

          Continue reading →

          THE BOYS ARE BACK SPECIAL FEATURE: Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor ceremony (video)

          Ring of Honor Ceremony

          Watch as Drew Pearson, Larry Allen, and Charles Haley are inducted into the Cowboys Ring of Honor.

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          Audio Courtesy: Brad Sham and the Dallas Cowboys Radio Network | The Fan KRLD 105.3 FM 

          DALLAS COWBOYS RING OF HONOR: Emotional day for Drew Pearson, Charles Haley, and Larry Allen

          Video link – Click HERE
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          After waiting many years for his place in the Dallas Cowboys’ Ring of Honor, Drew Pearson didn’t know what to do Sunday once he put on that blue jacket.

          “It was like a feeling of satisfaction, it was a climax to a journey,” Pearson said. “It’s a very emotional time. If I wasn’t so vain, I probably would have cried out there. But the tears were definitely flowing inside.”

          Offensive tackle Larry Allen and defensive end Charles Haley joined Drew Pearson as the three inductees into the Cowboys’ Ring of Honor during halftime of Sunday’s game against Seattle.

          Drew Pearson, 60, was inducted into the Ring of Honor 28 years after he retired from the NFL.

          “It doesn’t bother me because it’s now,” Pearson said. “It’s nice to be going forward where you don’t have to be asked that question anymore … why aren’t you [in the Ring of Honor]?”

          “My kids thought that was my first name for a long time, because everybody comes up to me [and says] ‘why aren’t you in, why aren’t you this?’”

          Charles Haley also was emotional during the post-Ring of Honor news conference. He said he’s not thinking about whether joining the Ring of Honor will help him make it into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

          “I’m thinking that Jerry Jones is a great man right now, that’s what I’m thinking,” said Haley, who played for the Cowboys from 1992-’96. “I’m not thinking about tomorrow. You can write and think about tomorrow. I’m thinking about today and how great today is. I’m enjoying this moment and I hope you help me enjoy this moment.”

          Larry Allen also was enjoying his moment.

          “Before every game I would look up there [at the names of the other Ring of Honor inductees] the most,” he said. “At a certain point of games, I would just look up there…. try to find a way to get up there.’’

          On Sunday, Larry Allen finally made it “up there’’ in the Ring of Honor. So, too, did Drew Pearson and Charles Haley.

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          RELATED: Dallas Cowboys add three players to Ring of Honor

          ARLINGTON — The Dallas Cowboys stayed in the playoff hunt with a win over the Seattle Seahawks on Sunday, but the big story at the game came at halftime, as three of the team’s greatest players were added to the Ring of Honor.

          It’s been six years since the Cowboys inducted new members into the Ring, when the “Triplets” — Troy Aikman, Michael Irvin and Emmitt Smith — saw their names unveiled at the old Texas Stadium.

          On Sunday, Larry Allen, Charles Haley and Drew Pearson joined them.

          Allen was a domanant offensive guard who played for the Cowboys from the mid-1990s into the 21st century. He made 11 Pro Bowl appearances during his career in Dallas and played on their Super Bowl XXX team.

          “I’d like to thank Jerry [Jones] and his family; the Cowboys organization; my beautiful wife; my three great kids; I’d like to say thank you for playing for the greatest fans in America,” Allen said.

          Haley played on that team, too, and on the other two Cowboys championship teams from the 90s. Haley also won a couple of Super Bowls in San Francisco.

          “This is not a right, but a privilege, and God knows… this is one of the greatest things that’s happened in my life,” Haley told the cheering crowd.

          Drew Pearson is the one we’ve been waiting for… but not as long as he’s been waiting. His last season with the Cowboys was in 1983.

          “I waited. I prayed. And because I prayed, I always believed that this day would one day come,” Pearson said. “And I am so happy and so proud to be a part of this distinguished Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor!”

          The three added Sunday are all very deserving and bring the total number of Cowboys in the Ring of Honor to 20.

          Courtesy: TED MADDEN | WFAA Dallas

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          Backup link to video: http://www.wfaa.com/sports/football/Cowboys-add-three-to-Ring-of-Honor-133333238.html

          DALLAS COWBOYS RING OF HONOR: Who will be next?

          Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor - The Boys Are Back
          Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor – The Boys Are Back

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          Today the Cowboys will induct Larry Allen, Charles Haley and Drew Pearson into the Ring of Honor. It’s the first time the Cowboys have conducted such an event since the Triplets in 2005.

          With that we look at ten players who might be next for the Jerry Jones committee of one to consider.

          Harvey Martin.No name resonates more with former Cowboys players than this man. He led the Cowboys in sacks seven times, is the unofficial franchise leader with 114 and holds the single-season mark of 23 sacks in the 1977 season. Before there was Charles Haley and DeMarcus Ware, Martin along with Randy White and Bob Lilly set the standard for pass rushers in franchise history.

          Bill Bates.A special teams ace and despite making just one Pro Bowl, 1984, he was a beloved figure in Cowboys lore. When you think of outstanding special teams players in Cowboys history, Bates’ name comes up first. Nobody was better on a unit the causal fan knew nothing about.

          Darren Woodson. A three-time All Pro, a five-time Pro Bowler won three Super Bowl titles. He was a talented safety who not only covered tight ends but wide receivers. His presence is still felt at Valley Ranch, because the Cowboys have not replaced him and his signature is inside a locker of former safety Roy Williams, that’s now the home of cornerback Terence Newman.

          Everson Walls. He led the Cowboys in interceptions five times, is second all-time in franchise history with 44 and still holds the single-season record with 11 picks in 1981. The 11 picks is also the franchise record for a rookie. It would be nice if Walls gets in with Martin, another Dallas native.

          Jimmy Johnson. The second coach in Cowboys history rebuilt the franchise and won two Super Bowl titles and the third one, XXX in 1995 was with Barry Switzer, but it was Johnson’s team. The ending was bad, but there’s no denying what Johnson meant to the franchise.

          Charlie Waters. A three-time Pro Bowler at strong safety, Waters started 22 of 25 playoff games. He was a fierce hitter who gets lost because we talk so much about Cliff Harris. Waters is considered one of the top safeties in Cowboys history.

          Deion Sanders.He made his mark with Atlanta, yet, Sanders was a four-time Pro Bowler, three-time All Pro and of course won one title with the Cowboys. Sanders holds the career mark for punt return average at 13.3. He was the first big money free agency signed by the Cowboys and he was a playmaker on defense and special teams.

          Daryl Johnston. When Emmitt Smith broke the all-time rushing mark, he hugged this man. Johnston didn’t miss a game from 1992-to-1995. Johnston is one of the best fullbacks in franchise history, and his blocks paved the way for Smith to get a bulk of his yardage.

          Danny White. The third-round pick from Arizona State, made only one Pro Bowl, and he had just one losing season in the years he started, 1987 where he compiled a 3-6 mark at age 35. He took the Cowboys to three NFC title games, never advancing to the Super Bowl. White is second in completions in franchise history at 1,761.

          Mark Stepnoski.A five-time Pro Bowler who won three titles. But here’s a little known fact: He was named to the second-team of the 1990s All-Decade team. Stepnoski was a solid player during his era, not only with the Cowboys but in the NFL as well.

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          VIDEO: Roger Staubach discusses upcoming inductee’s into the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor

          Video - Roger Staubach - Discusses Ring of Honor - The Boys Are Back

          Video - Roger Staubach - Discusses Ring of Honor - The Boys Are Back

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          1 on 1: Roger Staubach

          Nick Eatman had a chance to sit down with Cowboys hall of famer and ring of honor member Roger Staubach to talk about the players being inducted into the ring of honor this weekend. Drew Pearson, Charles Haley, and Larry Allen will be immortalized with 15 other legendary Dallas Cowboys.

          RELATED: About the Cowboys’ Ring of Honor inductees

          Originally published 19 August 2011 11:32 PM | The Boys Are Back blog

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           DREW PEARSON

          Position: Wide receiver

          With the Cowboys: 1973-83

          How acquired: Undrafted free agent

          Notable:  Had 489 career receptions, third-most in club history. Hall of Famer Michael Irvin leads with 750. … Among Cowboys receivers with at least 200 career receptions, ranks fifth in yards-per-catch at 16. … Led NFL in receiving yards with 870 in 14-game season of 1977. Finished among league’s top 10 in receptions three times and top 10 in receiving yardage five times. … Named first-team All-Pro three times and selected to three Pro Bowls. … In 22 career playoff games, caught 67 passes for 1,105 yards and eight touchdowns. … Completed five of seven options passes for 192 yards and three touchdowns.

          Quotable: “I really don’t live in the past. Who is to say it’s the right time? For me, this is the right time. I’m 60 years old, and I’m going into the Dallas Cowboys’ Ring of Honor. How about that?”

           CHARLES HALEY

          Position: Defensive end-outside linebacker

          With the Cowboys: 1992-96

          How acquired: From San Francisco, for a second- and third-round draft choice

          Notable: Hybrid pass rusher. Had 33 sacks in 58 games during first four regular seasons with Cowboys. Finished fourth in NFL in sacks with 121/2 in 1995. Had 3 1/2 sacks and one interception in 10 postseason games. … Named first-team All-Pro in 1994 and selected to Pro Bowl in 1994-95. … Limited by back problems to one sack in five regular-season and two postseason games during final season with club. … Returned to San Francisco for two playoff games in 1998 and a full regular season in 1999.

          Quotable: “For my teammates, I tried to let them know I’d be there no matter what, hell or high water. I know I put a lot of
          teammates through hell, a lot of coaches through hell and owners. But Jerry stuck with me.”

          LARRY ALLEN

          Position: Offensive guard and tackle

          With the Cowboys: 1994-2005

          How acquired: Second-round pick, 1994

          Notable:  Made 170 starts at both tackle spots and right guard while with Cowboys. Started 10 games at right tackle as a rookie
          in 1994 and moved to right guard, starting every game in 1995, the last season the Cowboys won a Super Bowl. … During time with Cowboys, named first-team All-Pro six times and selected to 10 Pro Bowl teams. … Teammate and fellow offensive lineman
          Nate Newton said he saw more than a few defensive linemen matched against Allen “quit’ during games.

          Quotable: “When I was stretching before [home] games, I’d look up at those names in the Ring of Honor and hope I could find a way to get up there. I kept trying.”.

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          Want to read more The Boys Are Back blog posts about the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor? Click HERE

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          Direct video link: http://www.dallascowboys.com/multimedia/multimedia_archives.cfm?id=614F05CD-DC3D-8CF0-1EC79526228DABCC

          HISTORY: Dallas Cowboy notes

          Here are the notes compiled by the Dallas Cowboys‘ after  the game:

          Bruce Carter made his NFL debut tonight playing on special  teams.

          Last week DeMarco Murray established a club  record with 253 rushing yards. He became the ninth Dallas Cowboy to pass the 175  rushing yard mark. His 74 yards tonight represent the sixth-most following a  175-plus yard performance in club history:

                                                  175-plus                                Next Week

                   Player                         Yds       Opp      Date                Yds       Opp      Date

          Tony  Dorsett                183        @NYG  11/9/80          122         STL      11/16/80

          Emmitt  Smith              237        @Phi    10/31/93        117         NYG      11/7/93

          Tony  Dorsett                175        @Bal    12/6/81          101          PHI      12/13/81

          Tony  Dorsett                206        PHI       12/4/77            92         @SF     12/12/77

          Julius  Jones                198        @Sea   12/6/04            88          NO       12/12/04

          DeMarco  Murray        253        STL       10/23/11          74         @Phi     10/30/11

          Emmitt  Smith              182        @Pho   9/22/91            67         NYG      9/29/91

          Troy  Hambrick             189        @Was   12/14/03          36         NYG      12/21/03

          Julius  Jones                194        @Car    12/24/05          35         STL      1/1/06

          Laurent Robinson led all Cowboys with 103 receiving yards.  It was his second 100-yard effort of the season and the third of his career. He  also had his first touchdown as a Dallas Cowboy on a 70-yard reception. It was  the second-longest catch of his career behind a74-yard touchdown catch while  with Atlanta (at Arizona, 12/23/07).

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