Daily Archives: September 11th, 2013

JASON GARRETT PRESS CONFERENCE: 2013 Dallas Cowboys vs. Kansas City Chiefs

JASON GARRETT PRESS CONFERENCE - 2013 Dallas Cowboys vs. Kansas City Chiefs - 2013-2014 Dallas Cowboys schedule
Jason Garrett Press Conference 9/11/2013 (Duration – 13:35)

Dallas Cowboys coach Jason Garrett speaks to the media as his team continues their preparation for the Kansas City Chiefs. Garrett discussed:

  • Practicing at AT&T Stadium
  • Condition of three injured starters (Romo, Dez, Claiborne)
  • Brian Waters progress
  • Thoughts on Selvie and Spencer rotation
  • Preparation for Andy Reid and Kansas City Chiefs
  • Challenges of Sutton/Reid’s 3rd down defensive schemes
  • Evaluating Terrence Williams role on offense
  • Importance of reps and timing for new players with Romo
  • Competition, grading, and putting best guy on the field
  • Harris and Williams make each other better, competition philosophy
  • Joseph Randall progress
  • Romo’s low yards per pass attributed to working through progressions
  • Dez been getting double-coverage since he was a rookie, respected
  • Notes on what Garrett says to team from week-to-week (motivation)
  • Redzone and balance thoughts from New York Giants game
  • Kansas City offensive challenges for Texas 2 defense
  • Thoughts on Alex Smith’s west-coast style and past success
  • Balance of KC’s offense with Bowe, runners, and Smith’s mobility
  • AT&T Stadium tours during practice and security
  • NFL fines and effects on some players over time
  • Reflection on 2009 game in Kansas City
  • Miles Austin example of making best of opportunities

 

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MAN FROM MONMOUTH: Miles Austin’s 2009 breakout game in Kansas City was turning point

MILES FROM MONMOUTH - Austin’s 2009 breakout game in Kansas City was a turning point

IRVING, Texas – Some of the greatest games in Dallas Cowboys history can be categorized by a single player.

There’s a “Clint Longley Game” with his 1974 comeback throw to Drew Pearson on Thanksgiving Day. Jason Garrett has a game in beating the Packers exactly 20 years later. Even Emmitt Smith has a game with his heroic effort against the Giants in 1993.

And without a doubt, Miles Austin is included on that list. The “Miles Austin Game” occurred at the very place the Dallas Cowboys will revisit Sunday afternoon when they take on the Chiefs.

MILES FROM MONMOUTH - Austin’s 2009 breakout game in Kansas City was a turning point - catch

There is where Austin made his first career start, thanks to a rib injury to Roy Williams the previous week in Denver. To that point in his four-year career, Austin had played in 41 games, but had a total of 23 catches for 436 yards and four touchdowns.

Three hours later, Austin set the Cowboys’ single-game record with 250 receiving yards on 10 catches and two touchdowns, including a 60-yard score in overtime to give the Cowboys a much-needed 26-20 win over the Chiefs.

“Right at the end, we score and everyone jumps on the pile at the end …” Austin recalled. “It was a turning point for our season and obviously a turning point for me and my life. I thought it was a great team win. And I was glad to be a part of it.”

But Austin was more than just a part of it – he was basically the reason for it.

MILES FROM MONMOUTH - Austin’s 2009 breakout game in Kansas City was a turning point - 4th quarter TD catch

Austin had a game-tying touchdown catch over the middle in the fourth quarter. He then came back in overtime with a sideline grab before he broke a tackle attempt by Brandon Flowers and jaunted down the sideline for the score. The 250 yards broke Bob Hayes (246) single-game record for the Cowboys and marked the first time in NFL history a player recorded 250 yards in his first career start. It was also the first time in league record books a player had scored a game-winning touchdown in overtime in his first start.

The Cowboys head coach knows a thing or two about taking advantage of the moment in his own right. The win over Green Bay in 1994 is one of the more memorable moments in Cowboys history and obviously of his own career.

But as a coach, Garrett said Austin’s game in Kansas City ranks pretty high as well.

“It really was one of the best days I have been around in football – both as a player and as a coach,” said Garrett, the Cowboys offensive coordinator that day. “Miles Austin comes from Monmouth University as an undrafted free agent. He has an unbelievable way about him as a person and the approach that he takes as a football player. When a guy like that who comes from where he comes from and goes about it the way he does has that kind of success when he gets his opportunity … to this day I still kind of feel the thing down the back of my neck.

“It’s what this thing is all about. He goes about it the right way. He’s a pleasure to coach. It was a great day for him. It was a great day for our team. “

MILES FROM MONMOUTH - Austin’s 2009 breakout game in Kansas City was a turning point - celebration

The Cowboys entered the bye week after the Chiefs game with a 3-2 record. They followed the off week by winning three straight games en route to an 11-5 season. It was also the first time the Cowboys won a playoff game since 2009.

But while Austin’s performance in Kansas City is considered his most memorable, arguably as impressive was the follow-up game he had against Atlanta the next week. Austin proved his effort against the Chiefs was no fluke by torching the Falcons for 170 yards on six catches and two more scores.

So in the first 41 games, Austin had 436 receiving yards and four touchdowns. In those two starts, he had 420 yards and four touchdowns.

“I got lucky that the two teams we played were man teams. They had no film on me,” Austin said. “I had a big play in the Atlanta game, just running across the field. It was a great two-game stretch for sure. It’s been great ever since then.”

Austin made the Pro Bowl both in 2009 and 2010 and received a monster contract extension worth $54.1 million over seven years.

MILES FROM MONMOUTH - Austin’s 2009 breakout game in Kansas City was a turning point - Miles Austin Brandon Carr

Hamstring injuries have plagued him the last two seasons but he had a relatively healthy training camp and started off the 2013 campaign Sunday night by tying his career-high in catches with 10. While he didn’t go for 250 like he did in Kansas City, Austin was effective in the first half with underneath routes as the Giants took away the deep ball. He finished with a team-high 72 receiving yards.

Any time a player is coming off a game with double-digit catches, he should be a focal point for the opposing defense the following game.

Then again, considering his last trip to KC, that was probably already in the plans.


MAN FROM MONMOUTH - Miles Austin’s 2009 breakout game in Kansas City was turning point - Video

Miles Austin remembers 2009 KC game (Duration – 3:04)

Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Miles Austin sat down with Nick Eatman to discuss his coming out party in Kansas City in 2009.

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DALLAS COWBOY HONORED: Dwayne Harris named NFC Special Teams Player of the Week

DALLAS COWBOY HONORED - Dwayne Harris named NFC Special Teams Player of the Week

IRVING, Texas – Dwayne Harris was named the NFC Special Teams Player of the Week for the second time in his career after his performance against the New York Giants in the opener.

Most of Harris’ contributions throughout his career on special teams have come as a return man, but Harris led all players with three special teams tackles and was all over the field tracking down Giants return man Rueben Randle throughout the night.

Harris also served as the Dallas Cowboys’ punt returner, averaging 9.5 yards per return on two returns. He was also a vital part of helping recover a fumble on a muffed punt in the third quarter, as he dove for the ball and helped it squirt out to DeVonte Holloman.

Not all of Harris’ contributions came on special teams, as he also had two catches for 12 yards, but he was most noticeable on the coverage teams.

Harris also won the special teams honor in 2012 for his Nov. 11 performance against the Philadelphia Eagles. He’s the first player since Sam Hurd in 2006 to win the honor for his coverage more so than his kicking or returning.

Kicker Dan Bailey was the only other player to win the award for the Cowboys last year, earning it for his performance against the Cleveland Browns on Nov. 18.

THE LEGEND OF BEAR BRYANT: The Vince Lombardi of college football commemorates 100th birthday

Bryant 100th Football

Fred Thompson’s character Arthur Branch once said in an episode of Law and Order that “If it wasn’t for that sonuvabitch Bin Laden, we’d only remember September 11 as Bear Bryant’s birthday.” Today, many people throughout the world of college football—and especially in Alabama—will make Branch proud by not letting Bin Laden spoil the centennial celebration of Coach Paul “Bear” Bryant’s birthday.  

While working on Mama Called, a new documentary of Bryant’s life, I found myself pondering a question which I had asked myself many times over the years: Was Bear Bryant the greatest college football coach of all time?

Bear Bryant retired in 1982, after 25 years as Alabama's head coach. He died four weeks after coaching his last game for the Crimson Tide.

In the time since his death in 1983, it has become more and more obvious that he was. Two other coaches of major college football teams passed him up in the all-time victories list—Joe Paterno (409) and Bobby Bowden (377) won more games in the major college ranks—but Bryant’s won-lost percentage is considerably higher (.780 to Paterno’s .749 and Bowden’s .740). Bryant won more national championships (six) than Paterno and Bowden combined (four). And for what it’s worth, Bryant was 4-0 in head-to-head matchups with Paterno.

Bryant’s stature in college football is so great that there’s really only one other football coach since World War II whose reputation compares—Vince Lombardi, another man whose 100th birthday was commemorated this year. I once asked Bart Starr, who had known Bryant for years and who won five championships under Lombardi at Green Bay, if he thought Bryant was the Vince Lombardi of college football. Starr said, “At the least. Some people might call Coach Lombardi the Bear Bryant of pro football.” (More on that comparison later.)

Vince Lombardi

Paul Bryant coached at four universities and completely turned their football programs around for the better. Maryland was 1-7-1 in 1944, and then, in Bryant’s first and only season as head coach, went 6-2-1. Kentucky was 2-8-0 in 1945; in Bryant’s first year, 1946, the Wildcats were 7-3. In 1953, the Texas A&M Aggies were 4-5-1. When Bryant got there the next year, he gutted the entire squad and rebuilt it practically from scratch; the Aggies finished just 1-9 in 194, but Bryant’s labor bore fruit the next year, when they jumped to 7-2-1, and in 1956, they were the Southwest Conference Champions at 9-0-1. The Alabama Crimson Tide were 2-7-1 in 1957 to 5-4-1 in 1958 under Bryant, and, of course, the rest is history.

Bryant is the only coach to have achieved greatness in both the era of limited substitution (when all players had to spend some time on both offense and defense) and the era of unlimited substitution, the modern era of football when players specialized at just one position.

Bryant coached 133 games against 25 men who were eventually voted into the College Football Hall of Fame; in those games, Bryant was 85-42-6. He also coached against 11 of his former players and assistant coaches, with a record of 45-6. LSU’s longtime coach Charlie McClendon once ruefully exclaimed, “He taught me everything I know, but not everything he knows.”

The vast majority of college football historians have also overlooked the fact that Bryant is the only coach to have achieved greatness in both the era of limited substitution (or one-platoon football, as it was called, when all players had to spend some time on both offense and defense) and the era of unlimited substitution, the modern era of football when players specialized at just one position.

Bryant coached for 38 seasons, and his career breaks right down the middle between the eras of one-platoon and two-platoon ball.  The difference was probably best summed up in a comment Bryant once made to me during an interview: “In the old days, you spent more time coaching football. Nowadays [with expanded staffs and larger rosters] you spend more time coaching the coaches.”

From 1945 t0 1963, his record was 141-49-13 for an excellent .727 win-loss percentage, while from 1964-1982 he was 182-36-4 for an awesome .829. No other football coach who had to make the adjustment from limited to unlimited substitution in the game even begins to compare.

However, Benny Marshall a longtime columnist for the Birmingham News, tapped into one of the most important, fascinating sets of parallel stories in sports history when he drew the comparison (if an overblown, rather unflattering one) between Bryant and Vince Lombardi—going so far as to refer to Lombardi as “a poor man’s Bear Bryant.”

Bear Bryant met and married his wife, Mary Harmon, while they were both students at Alabama

Besides being born in the same year, Bryant’s and Lombardi’s lives shared an amazing number of similarities. Both men married young and stayed married to the same woman their entire lives. Both had two children, a son and a daughter, —and both sons were named after their fathers. Their football mentors—Jim Crowley at Fordham for Lombardi and Frank Thomas at Alabama for Bryant—learned the game under Knute Rockne at Notre Dame. Both won their first championship in 1961. They each developed close and lasting relationships with rebellious prodigies—Lombardi with Paul Hornung, Bryant with Joe Namath. And both, of course, were uncompromising taskmasters who stressed fundamentals and discipline.

They nearly played against each other when Alabama met Fordham at the Polo Grounds in New York in 1933; Lombardi was ineligible for Fordham’s varsity squad but was in the stands that day.

Bear Bryant appeared on the cover of Time Magazine

Lombardi’s impact on pro football has faded; he has no protégés or disciples still in the game. But The Bear’s influence still pervades every level of the game, from small colleges to the pros. Joe Namath, his most famous recruit, helped bring out about the merger of the American and National Football League. Ozzie Newsome, one of Bryant’s first black All-Americans, is currently general manager of the Baltimore Ravens. John Mitchell, the first black player to start for the Crimson Tide and Bryant’s first black assistant coach, is now in his 20th season as defensive line coach for the Pittsburgh Steelers. And Sylvester Croom, who starred at center and later served as an assistant coach for Bryant, became the first black coach at a Southeastern Conference school, Mississippi State, in 2004, and is the new running backs coach for the Tennessee Titans.

Bryant’s domain, I would argue, was larger than Lombardi’s or any other pro football coach’s. For nearly four decades Bryant was the dominant figure in what the great sportswriter Dan Jenkins called in his book, Saturday’s America, “the world of small towns and college communities that, from Labor Day through New Year’s, gives unqualified devotion to college football, displaying the kind of unbridled enthusiasm that can only be faked or imitated in pro football stadiums.”

Courtesy: Allen Barra

Allen Barra writes about sports for the Wall Street Journal and TheAtlantic.com. His next book is Mickey and Willie–The Parallel Lives of Baseball’s Golden Age.

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